LNT Tips

DSM’s additions to the 7 core principles of Leave No Trace. Deep South Mountaineering is founded by Leave no Trace Trainers and Wilderness Ranger and is dedicated to sustainable recreation practices that best care for the land. We are happy to be a small business partner of Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics.

 

Plan ahead and Prepare
-Learn about area specific regulations and permits. Bring proper equipment and seek out education to make sure you can handle the challenges you will face in the wild.
-Research the trees in the area to guess strap lengths to fit with trees. Are there trees?
-Check the weather, bugs, nearest hospital, get a map, and sharables (delicious treats to share with your friends/new friends; candy, wine, sandwiches, hot coco).

 

Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
-Try to use trees over 6 inches in diameter. These trees are generally more mature, stronger and can more easily take the pressure of straps without long term damage.
-Always inspect trees for good health/solid structure before getting in your hang. Avoid hanging on dead trees and below dead limbs in trees.
-Try to find open hang spots where you don’t have to disturb other plants and trees. Try not to brake branches or hurt vegetation to give you a more open area.
-Always inspect the area above your hammock-site for dead limbs that could possibly fall. Inspect the health of your trees you intend to use for your hang and the surrounding trees.
-Be mindful of the vegetation below your hang and how your trampling affects it
-Do not floss or rub the tree excessively with strap suspension system. Flossing can damage the bark, creating abrasions that are unsightly and may lead to more serious problems with the tree.
-Try to use webbing rather than rope for your suspension system. The smaller surface area of the rope can cut more noticeably into the bark.

Dispose of Waste Properly
Stick to the Better Pooping Practices
-200 feet from water keeps the stream safe to drink.
-Shoot to bring out MORE than you brought in. See an extra piece of trash and your bags already open? Toss it in, and thank yourself for me.
-Burning trash is not a proper way to dispose of waste.

Leave what you find
-It’s tempting to pick flowers or collect Arrowheads, but what sits on your mantle gathers dust while what blossoms on public land can be enjoyed by all.
-Take only pictures and memories please whenever possible.

Minimize Campfire Impacts
-Fires are spectacular and so are small fires. Try to think closer to finger sized wood than logs if it’s just for fun.
-Try not to travel with wood. You could transfer seeds or pests of invasive species that could wreak havoc on native ecosystems.
-If an area does not allow fires it is probably with VERY good reason. Soil, trees, ground wood, can years to regenerate after catastrophic events and fire can continue oppression of a resource in recovery.

 

Respect Wildlife
-Proper food storage is the highest priority. People food is wonderfully calories dense and delicious. Ever taste a wild animal has changes its focus towards your snacks and away from its natural food chain. Than when the animal gets too friendly it has to be removed. A Fed Bear is a Dead Bear
-Dogs do not repel bears. Having one is not an excuse to sleep with your food.

 

Be Considerate of Other Visitors
-If you are in the presence of tent campers, pick sites that are over the only flat tentpads available (visa versa).
-Following the previous principles creates a sustainable public resource, showing the greatest commitment to the resource and its users.

 

Ask me anything about Leave No Trace, make my day.
Stephen@deepsouthmountaineering.com

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